Comet NEOWISE

The comet NEOWISE whizzes through the night sky above Heart Mountain, around 3:30 a.m. July 12 north of Cody. The comet’s once-in-a-lifetime close passage by the sun "is cooking the comet’s outermost layers, causing gas and dust to erupt off the icy surface and creating a large tail of debris," NASA explained in a recent write-up. The comet is visible with the naked eye just after sunset, but binoculars offer better views as the object hurtles back toward the outer reaches of the solar system.

The comet NEOWISE whizzes through the night sky above Heart Mountain, around 3:30 a.m. July 12 north of Cody. The comet’s once-in-a-lifetime close passage by the sun "is cooking the comet’s outermost layers, causing gas and dust to erupt off the icy surface and creating a large tail of debris," NASA explained in a recent write-up. The comet is visible with the naked eye just after sunset, but binoculars offer better views as the object hurtles back toward the outer reaches of the solar system. (Photo by Greg Wise, Powell Tribune)

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